Workshop 7






















Information and Communication Technology (ICT) capability

In the Australian Curriculum, students develop ICT capability as they learn to use ICT effectively and appropriately to access, create and communicate information and ideas, solve problems and work collaboratively in all learning areas at school, and in their lives beyond school. The capability involves students in learning to make the most of the technologies available to them, adapting to new ways of doing things as technologies evolve and limiting the risks to themselves and others in a digital environment.

The Melbourne Declaration on the Educational Goals for Young Australians (MCEETYA 2008) recognises that in a digital age, and with rapid and continuing changes in the ways that people share, use, develop and communicate with ICT, young people need to be highly skilled in its use. To participate in a knowledge-based economy and to be empowered within a technologically sophisticated society now and into the future, students need the knowledge, skills and confidence to make ICT work for them at school, at home, at work and in their communities.

Information and communication technologies are fast and automated, interactive and multimodal, and they support the rapid communication and representation of knowledge to many audiences and its adaptation in different contexts. They transform the ways that students think and learn and give them greater control over how, where and when they learn.

http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/GeneralCapabilities/Information-and-Communication-Technology-capability/Introduction/Introduction


Information and Communication Technology (ICT) capability continuum across stages of schooling

Applying social and ethical protocols and practices

Intellectual property

By the end of Year 2 students:
  • recognise that people create information resources and that the information they create or provide can be used or misused by others (for example understanding that you cannot copy someone else’s work)
By the end of Year 6 students:
  • apply practices that comply with legal obligations regarding the ownership and use of information resources (for example naming sources, avoiding plagiarism, knowing what may or may not be copied)
By the end of Year 10 students:
  • recognise ethical dilemmas and apply practises that protect intellectual property (for example understanding that pirating denies musicians payment for their work)

Information security

By the end of Year 2 students:
  • follow class rules about using resources and apply basic guidelines to secure personal information (for example recognising that when logging onto the network, they are only able to access their own folders)
By the end of Year 6 students:
  • apply strategies for protecting the security of personal information (for example checking integrity of web links)
By the end of Year 10 students:
  • use a range of strategies for securing and protecting information and understand the need for codes of conduct (for example using filters to divert junk mail)

Personal security

By the end of Year 2 students:
  • recognise that need to take care in sharing personal information (for example messaging only to people you know)
By the end of Year 6 students:
  • recognise the rights, identify privacy and emotional safety of themselves and others when using ICT (for example understanding the dangers of providing personal information, recognising ways of using ICT that can result in cyber bullying)
By the end of Year 10 students:
  • apply appropriate strategies to protect rights, identity, privacy and emotional safety of others when using ICT (for example identifying possible consequences of posting personal information on social networking sites, taking responsibility for the effect of their communications on other people)

ICT and society

By the end of Year 2 students:
  • identify how ICT is used in their homes and at school (for example identifying examples in the community such as borrowing a library book, online lunch ordering)
By the end of Year 6 students:
  • explain the use of ICT at school and in the local community, and understand its impact on their lives (for example recognising the potential impact on health of prolonged electronic game playing)
By the end of Year 10 students:
  • assess the impact of ICT in the workplace and in society, and speculate on its role in the future and how they can influence its use (for example recognising the potential of enhanced inclusivity for people with disability through ICT)

Investigating with ICT

Defining and planning information searches

By the end of Year 2 students:
  • use ICT to identify, record, group and classify textual and graphic information to show what is known and what needs to be investigated.
By the end of Year 6 students:
  • use appropriate ICT to identify and represent patterns in sets of information and to pose questions (for example using tables in word processing and charts in spreadsheets)
By the end of Year 10 students:
  • select and use appropriate ICT independently and collaboratively, analyse information to frame questions and plan search strategies (for example using wikis, searching databases)

Locating and accessing data and information

By the end of Year 2 students:
  • locate and retrieve textual and graphic information from a range of digital sources (for example locating information following hyperlinks and typing in simple URL, printing pages, copying and pasting text and images)
By the end of Year 6 students:
  • plan, locate (using search engines and basic search functions), retrieve and organise information in meaningful ways (for example searching within document – find/search/buttons/tabs; locating files within school directory; searching across web or within site)
By the end of Year 10 students:
  • use advanced search tools and techniques to locate precise data and information that supports the development of new understandings (for example using logical statements such as true/false; searching within fields or for data type; using datalogger equipment; digital microscope)

Selecting and evaluating data and information

By the end of Year 2 students:
  • explain the usefulness of located information (for example explaining how digital information answers a question)
By the end of Year 6 students:
  • assess the suitability of information using appropriate criteria (for example selecting the most useful/reliable/relevant digital resource from a set of three or four alternatives)
By the end of Year 10 students:
  • develop and use and criteria systematically to evaluate the quality, suitability and credibility of located information and sources (for example comparing objective data from multiple digital sources to evaluate the likely credibility of the information provided)

Creating with ICT

Generating ideas, plans and processes

By the end of Year 2 students:
  • use ICT to prepare simple plans to find solutions or answers to questions (for example drawing simple mindmap using conceptual mapping software; drawing software to show steps in sequence)
By the end of Year 6 students:
  • use ICT effectively to record ideas, represent their thinking and plan solutions (for example using timeline software to plan processes; concept mapping and brainstorming software to generate key ideas)
By the end of Year 10 students:
  • select and use ICT to articulate ideas and concepts, and plan the development of complex solutions (for example using software to create hyperlinks, tables and charts)

Generating solutions to challenges and learning area tasks

By the end of Year 2 students:
  • experiment with ICT as a creative tool to generate simple solutions or modifications for particular audiences or purposes (for example using the basic functionality of limited software to manipulate text, images, audio and numbers)
By the end of Year 6 students:
  • create digital solutions, independently or collaboratively, for particular audiences and purposes (for example manipulating images, text, video and sound for presentations; creating podcasts)
By the end of Year 10 students:
  • design and modify creative digital solutions, for particular audiences and for a range of purposes (for example modelling solutions in spreadsheets, creating movies, animations, websites and music; programming games; using databases; creating web pages for visually impaired users)

Communicating with ICT

Collaborating sharing and exchanging

By the end of Year 2 students:
  • use identified ICT tools safely to share and exchange information with appropriate audiences (for example using email to read and post electronic messages)
By the end of Year 6 students:
  • select and use appropriate ICT tools safely to share and exchange information and to collaborate with others (for example contributing to the content of a wiki; blogging and posting to bulletin boards)
By the end of Year 10 students:
  • select and use a range of ICT tools efficiently and safely to share and exchange information and to construct knowledge collaboratively (for example using online applications and management tools for collaborative projects such as online portals, wikis)

Understanding and applying social protocols

By the end of Year 2 students:
  • apply basic social protocols when communicating with known audiences (for example addressing recipients appropriately in emails)
By the end of Year 6 students:
  • apply generally accepted social protocols when sharing information in online environments, taking into account different social and cultural contexts (for example not posting a photo without the owner’s permission; not revealing details of identity)
By the end of Year 10 students:
  • discriminate between protocols suitable for different communication tools when collaborating with local and global communities (for example using appropriate salutations; adjusting length and formality of message to suit form of communication)

Applying techniques or strategies to ensure security of information

By the end of Year 2 students:
  • use limited techniques to ensure digital security (for example logging on to server and email)
By the end of Year 6 students:
  • independently establish secure accounts for approved online environments (for example using non-predictable user names and passwords)
By the end of Year 10 students:
  • assess the risks associated with online environments and establish appropriate security strategies as required (for example modifying default parameters at social networking site)

Managing and operating ICT

Using ICT efficiently and ergonomically

By the end of Year 2 students:
  • safely use a limited range of devices, functions and commands when operating an ICT system (for example mouse, USB flash drive, printer, digital camera, robot)
By the end of Year 6 students:
  • use a range of devices ergonomically and with increasing efficiency, and use basic troubleshooting procedures to solve routine malfunctions (for example using printer queues, file servers, scanners, probes, digital cameras)
By the end of Year 10 students:
  • use and optimise a selected range of devices and software functions to meet particular tasks (for example altering toolbars, sorting and layout functions; using duplex printing; setting proxies)

Selecting hardware and software

By the end of Year 2 students:
  • identify appropriate software for a task (for example using page layout software for posters)
By the end of Year 6 students:
  • select from appropriate hardware and software to undertake specific tasks (for example selecting specific graphics software or graphic tools in word processors)
By the end of Year 10 students:
  • independently select and apply appropriate software and hardware to suit specific tasks, purposes and social contexts (for example selecting an appropriate option for creating a website such as an online tool or an HTML editor)

Understanding ICT systems

By the end of Year 2 students:
  • identify the main components of an ICT system, their fundamental functions, and describe them using basic ICT terminology (for example identifying basic hardware and peripherals, such as mouse, keyboard, monitor, printer, and some software programs, such as word processing, drawing and paint software)
By the end of Year 6 students:
  • understand the uses of basic ICT system components (for example input – keyboard; process – central processing unit; output – display to monitor; storage – USB, hard drive)
By the end of Year 10 students:
  • apply an understanding of ICT system components to make changes to functions, processes, procedures and devices to fit the purpose of the solutions (for example saving files in different formats so that they are compatible across different software platforms)

Managing digital data

By the end of Year 2 students:
  • manage and maintain digital files with guidance (for example saving and retrieving files; providing unique names for files; applying basic functions such as opening and dragging-and dropping files)
By the end of Year 6 students:
  • effectively manage and maintain files on different storage mediums – locally and on networks (for example saving/exporting data in files of different formats; routinely backing up and protecting data; moving a file from one location to another)
By the end of Year 10 students:
  • manage and maintain files securely in a variety of storage mediums and formats (for example designing and using logical and sustainable file/folder naming conventions; maintaining version control of documents; limiting access to files by location or password


























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